CERT Flashcards
Unit 1 – Disaster Preparedness

Unit 1: Preparedness #27
Possible Infrastructure Damage – Financial Services

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ATMs do not work
Credit card systems inoperable

Unit 1: Preparedness #27
Unit 1: Preparedness #26
Possible Infrastructure Damage – Fuel Supplies

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Increased risk of fire or explosion from fuel line rupture
Risk of asphyxiation

Unit 1: Preparedness #26
Unit 1: Preparedness #25
Possible Infrastructure Damage – Water Service

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Medical facilities hampered
Inadequate water flow, which results in notice to boil water and hampered firefighting capabilities
Increased risk to public health

Unit 1: Preparedness #25
Unit 1: Preparedness #24
Possible Infrastructure Damage – Utilities

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Loss of service
Increased risk of fire or electrical shock
Limited access to fuel, e.g., pumps that may not work
Loss of contact between victims and service providers

Unit 1: Preparedness #24
Unit 1: Preparedness #23
Possible Infrastructure Damage – Communication Systems

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Victims unable to call for help
Coordination of services is hampered
Families and friends cannot communicate

Unit 1: Preparedness #23
Unit 1: Preparedness #22
Possible Infrastructure Damage – Structures

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Damaged critical facilities (e.g., hospitals, fire stations, police precincts, airports) unable to function normally
Increased risk of damage from falling debris

Unit 1: Preparedness #22
Unit 1: Preparedness #21
Possible Infrastructure Damage – Transportation

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Inability to assess damage accurately
Ambulances prevented from reaching victims
Police prevented from reaching areas of civil unrest
Fire departments prevented from getting to fires
Flow of needed supplies (food, water, etc.) is interrupted
Roads are closed and/or impassable

Unit 1: Preparedness #21
Unit 1: Preparedness #20
What key elements do disasters have in common?

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Regardless of the event, disasters have several key elements in common:
They are relatively unexpected, with little or no warning or opportunity to prepare.
Available personnel and emergency services may be overwhelmed initially by demands for their services.
Lives, health, and the environment are endangered.

Unit 1: Preparedness #20
Unit 1: Preparedness #19
How can you assess your community’s vulnerability to hazards?

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Identify the most common disasters that occur
Identify possible hazards with most severe impact
Consider recent and/or historical impacts
Identify susceptible locations in the community for specific hazards: people, buildings, infrastructure
Consider what to expect for disruption of services and length of restoration

Unit 1: Preparedness #19
Unit 1: Preparedness #18
What are 3 kinds of disasters?

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Natural (earthquakes, wildfires, floods, extreme heat, hurricanes, landslides, thunderstorms, tornadoes, tsunamis, volcanic eruptions, winter storms)
Technological (hazardous material spill, nuclear power plant accident)
Intentional (terrorism using chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, or explosive weapons)

Unit 1: Preparedness #18
Unit 1: Preparedness #17
What personal protective equipment (PPE) are CERT members required to wear?

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Hard hat
Protective eyewear (safety goggles)
N-95 mask
Leather work and non-latex exam gloves
Long-sleeved shirt
Reflective vest
Long pants
Sturdy shoes or boots

Unit 1: Preparedness #17
Unit 1: Preparedness #16
What is the EOP?

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All government agencies with a role in disaster response work to organize and coordinate their agencies’ activities before an emergency or disaster. The product of their work is the Emergency Operations Plan or “EOP” for that community. The EOP:
Assigns responsibility
Sets forth lines of authority
Describes how people and property will be protected
Identifies personnel,equipment, facilities, supplies, and other resources

Unit 1: Preparedness #16
Unit 1: Preparedness #15
Personal preparedness should be tailored to the hazards in your community, but should include:

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Learning about community alerts, warnings, and plans
Learning about appropriate protective actions
Developing household plans and conducting drills to practice
Assembling disaster supplies in multiple locations
Reducing hazards in the home
Encouraging others to prepare and volunteering to help your community

Unit 1: Preparedness #15
Unit 1: Preparedness #14
What are some Independent Study (IS) courses you can take?

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IS-100.a Introduction to Incident Command System
IS-200.a ICS for Single Resources and Initial Action Incidents
IS-700.a National Incident Management System (NIMS), An Introduction
IS-800.b National Response Framework, An Introduction
For a complete listing and access to FEMA Independent Study courses, visit http://www.training.fema.gov/is/crslist.aspx.

Unit 1: Preparedness #14
Unit 1: Preparedness #13
What is a CERT member’s first responsibility?

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A CERT member’s first responsibility is personal and family safety.
Only after personal and family safety is secured is it possible and pertinent to respond in a group capacity to do what is necessary for the community as a whole.

Unit 1: Preparedness #13
Unit 1: Preparedness #12
Preparedness requires active participation from all. What can you do?

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Start the process by talking to your friends and family about the hazards in your area and what steps you all need to take to be able to help each other in a crisis – large or small.
Ask about emergency planning at your workplace, yourschools, your place of worship, and other social settings.
Make sure that those in charge have a plan and are connected to community authorities on emergency management and planning.

Unit 1: Preparedness #12
Unit 1: Preparedness #11
Is a shelter-in-place room the same as a safe room?

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No, a safe room is NOT the same as a shelter-in-place location. A safe room requires significant fortification in order for the room to provide protection against extremely high winds. More information is available at http://www.fema.gov/safe-rooms
Sheltering-in-place is done to protect against contaminants in the air. To shelter-in-place, you do not need to alter the structure of the room. You are simply sealing the room with plastic sheeting and duct tape for a short period of time while the contaminants in the air dissipate.

Unit 1: Preparedness #11
Unit 1: Preparedness #10
Non-structural hazard mitigation includes relatively simple actions you can take to prevent home furnishings and appliances from causing damage or injuries during any event that might cause them to shift. What things can you do?

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Anchor heavy furniture
Secure appliances and office equipment
Install hurricane storm shutters
Secure cabinet doors with childproof fasteners
Locate and label gas, electricity, and water shutoffs
Secure water heaters and have flexible gas lines installed

Unit 1: Preparedness #10
Unit 1: Preparedness #9
What clothing and bedding should you include in your emergency supplies?

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Include at least one complete change of clothing and footwear per person (and remember to change for the different seasons!)
Sturdy shoes or boots
Rain gear
Blankets or sleeping bags
Hat and gloves
Thermal underwear
Sunglasses

Unit 1: Preparedness #9
Unit 1: Preparedness #8
What kitchen items should you include in your emergency supplies?

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Manual can opener
Mess kits or paper cups, plates, and plastic utensils
All-purpose knife
Household liquid bleach to treat drinking water
Aluminum foil and plastic wrap
Resealable plastic bags
If food must be cooked, small cooking stove and a can of cooking fuel

Unit 1: Preparedness #8
Unit 1: Preparedness #7
How can you purify water?

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If you have questions about the quality of the water, purify it before drinking.
You can heat water to a rolling boil for 1 minute or use commercial purification tablets to purify the water.
You can also use regular household liquid chlorine bleach if it is pure 5.25% sodium hypochlorite. (Do not use perfumed bleach!)
To purify water, use these ratios of water and bleach:
  • 5 Gallons – 1/2 Teaspoon
  • 1 Gallon – 8 Drops
  • 1 Quart – 2 Drops
Unit 1: Preparedness #7
Unit 1: Preparedness #6
What kinds of food are best for your disaster supplies?

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Check food and water expiration dates biannually.
Ready-to-eat canned meats, fruits, and vegetables
Canned juices, milk, soup (if powdered, store extra water)
Staples: sugar, salt, pepper
High-energy food: peanut butter, jelly, crackers, granola bars, trail mix Foods for infants, elderly persons, or persons on special diets
Comfort and stress foods: cookies, hard candy, sweetened cereals, lollipops, instant coffee, tea bags

Unit 1: Preparedness #6
Unit 1: Preparedness #5
How many days supply of food should you have?

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Store at least a 3-day supply of nonperishable food.
Select foods that require no refrigeration, preparation, or cooking and little or no water.

Unit 1: Preparedness #5
Unit 1: Preparedness #4
How can you store water?

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Store water in plastic containers such as soft drink bottles. Look for the triangular recycling symbol with a number 1 on the bottom of the bottle as those are best for water storage.
Avoid using containers that will decompose or break, such as plastic milk jugs or glass bottles
Wash the bottle with soap and warm water, fill with water from your tap, and store in a cool, dark area away from direct sunlight.
Replace your emergency water every 6 months by repeating the process; like food and batteries, water does expire!

Unit 1: Preparedness #4
Unit 1: Preparedness #3
How much water should you store in preparation for a disaster?

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Store 1 gallon of water per person per day (2 quarts for drinking, 2 quarts for food preparation and sanitation).
Keep at least a 3-day supply of water for each person in your household. Keep in mind that a normally active person needs to drink at least 2 quarts of water each day.
Hot environments and intense physical activity can double that requirement.
Children, nursing mothers, and ill people will need more.

Unit 1: Preparedness #3
Unit 1: Preparedness #2
How do you shelter-in-place?

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Identify an internal room in your home, at work, or other locations where you spend a great deal of time.
If sheltering-in-place is needed, you will be in this room for only a few hours, but it is important that you be able to seal the room quickly.
Storing specific items in the room is helpful. You should have snacks and water; a battery-operated radio, a flashlight, and pre-cut plastic sheeting and duct tape to seal off vents and door and window openings.

Unit 1: Preparedness #2
Unit 1: Preparedness #1
What are some of the non-structural hazards in your neighborhood, homes, or workplaces?

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Gas line ruptures from water heaters or ranges displaced by shaking, water, or wind
Damage from falling books, dishes, or other cabinet contents
Risk of injury or electric shock from displaced appliances and office equipment
Fire from faulty wiring, overloaded plugs, frayed electrical cords

Unit 1: Preparedness #1